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When It’s Time To Call a Roofer

Some roof repairs may be able to be fixed by homeowners, but other repairs are more extensive and need the expertise of professional roofers. When you check out our recent reviews and portfolio of our completed projects, we know you’ll be satisfied choosing experts in roofing Canton, MI. Here’s a couple signs that it’s time to give us a call:

Five Signs It’s Time to Call a Roofer

As your home’s first line of defense, your roof takes a lot of abuse from the elements. Knowing these five signs that it’s time to call a roofer helps you protect the integrity of your home.

Damaged or missing shingles

Buckling, curling and blistering shingles indicate that the roof is at the end of its lifespan, according to the National Roofing Contractors Association. Missing shingles are also a serious problem that needs addressing because they leave the interior of your roof exposed to the elements.

Another sign it’s time to call a roofer is an excessive amount of shingle granules in the gutters. These small bumps that cover shingles give them extra weight and ultraviolet ray protection; losing them leaves the shingles exposed.

Flashing damage

Flashing consists of the metal sheets installed on the roof to prevent water from entering the home at an angle or through a joint. Flashing failure is one of the top reasons for roof leaks. If the flashing has sustained damage and is pulling away from the roof, it’s time to call a roofer.

Leaking and water spots

Leaks and wet spots on the ceiling are an obvious sign that you need to call a roofer as soon as possible. If you have an attic that you use just for storage, make sure to check it on a weekly basis for damp or dark spots during stormy weather and immediately call a roofer if you see leaks or staining.

Moss-covered roof

Large amounts of moss on your roof indicate deteriorating shingles. The roots of moss overtake shingles and cause a breakdown in the material. Moss also works its way in-between shingles, which can loosen them, making the shingles more likely to be blown away by the wind. While a mild infestation of moss on the roof can be treated with certain chemicals, a large amount generally requires replacement of the roof in order to most effectively shield the building.

Read the full article at local.dexknows.com

How To Stay Safe While Roofing in Livonia, MI

Safety is of utmost importance to us here at Roof One. Whether its us working on the roof, or you, we want to make sure no one suffers a roofing related injury. Here’s some safety tips for roofing Livonia, MI to keep in mind the next time you climb up on a ladder to check out your roof:

Roof Safety Basics

Roofing projects don’t offer as much glamour as other home improvement projects, but it’s important to maintain from time to time. Homeowners may choose to complete small repairs, such as cracked flashing or a missing shingle themselves. These are easy projects to do but require some skill.

Before you get on the roof for that small fix, you should be aware of the safety risks associated with roof projects. Even if you have a one-story home, there’s still plenty that could go wrong that could harm you or damage your home. Here are a few roof safety basics to know before you get started on your next repair.

Ladder Safety

In order to repair your roof, you have to find a way to the source. Ladders are the obvious choice in most cases. According to the CDC, falls are the leading cause of unintentional injury nationwide. In fact, 43% of fatal falls involve a ladder for those on the job. This is important for homeowners to be aware of as they DIY. Ladder safety should be taken very seriously. Here are a few ladder safety tips to keep in mind:

  • Always be sure your ladder is on level ground.
  • Use a properly sized ladder to reach your roof safely; a ladder that’s too short is dangerous.
  • A roof ladder hook will ensure that your ladder is secure.
  • Follow the 4-to-1 ladder rule.
  • Keep three points of contact with the ladder at all times.

Working on A Roof Safely

When you’re working on the roof, there are a myriad of factors that impact safety. One of them is weather conditions. Never work on a roof if there is a storm coming in. Lightning is an obvious hazard, but a serious one. It’s unpredictable, but those working on a roof are at a higher risk. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, lighting can strike 10 miles away from any rainfall area. Part of the danger for those working on a roof is that they get back to work too soon. The NOAA recommends staying indoors at least 30 minutes after the storm has passed.

Read the full article at improvenet.com

Everything You Need To Know About Insulation

Are you losing money and increasing your energy consumption by not having a properly insulated home? Having an effective insulation system is a crucial aspect in maintaining your home or building. The same company you trust for roofing Dexter, MI  is one you can also rely on for all of your insulation solutions. Here’s a quick rundown of all the things you need to know about insulation:

Insulation—making the right choice

The obligation to insulate buildings has become very clear. With issues of rising energy prices over the longer term, security of energy supply based on Ireland’s reliance on imported fossil energy, and the potential for fuel poverty as heating costs rise in poorly insulated existing buildings, it is actually not just a positive investment but a critical one. With the various grants which are now available and coupled with rising energy costs there has never been a better time to insulate.

Before we delve into the amount of insulation recommended in each building element, it’s important to make a clear decision as to which insulation we should use.

All thermal insulation generally performs on the same basic principle: heat moves from warmer to colder areas. Thermal insulation separates the heated space from the cooler unheated space and it is the resistance of the thermal insulation that determines how long it takes for heat to transfer to the cold side. Therefore, on cold days, heat from inside a building seeks to get outside. On warmer days, the heat from outside the building seeks to get inside. Insulation is the material which slows down this process.

There are many forms of insulation on the market, which generally contain pockets of gas (e.g. air or pentane to name two), which resist the transfer of heat. At some stage, it is inevitable that heat will escape, but effective thermal insulation will slow down this process significantly.

Thermal insulation significantly reduces the energy required to heat buildings. In fact, if sufficient quality insulation is correctly installed in buildings, such as those built to the Passiv Haus standard, this can offset the requirement for any conventional heating system! Such buildings require a very low energy input for space heating, 90% less than that of conventional buildings. There are examples of this in over 10,000 Passiv Haus’s which are now constructed throughout the world, a number of which are built in Ireland.

In recent times insulating materials have played second fiddle to some of the more visual, plug on, “sexy”, renewable energy solutions. However, no matter what form of energy is used to meet the heating and cooling demands of a building, if it is not sufficiently or properly insulated, energy loss is inevitable.

Insulation should be an absolute priority at the early stage of any construction project. While budget is central to any building project, when choosing the type of insulation you require it is important to look beyond mere price comparisons, and evaluate the range of benefits each insulation material provides and its suitability for the job in hand.

Read the full article at energyquarter.com

 

Must-Know Roofing and Gutter Terms

Just like with any industry, there is a specific set of jargon needed to understand exactly what’s going on with your roofing project. Professionals in roofing, Port Huron can help break down those complicated construction terms so you know exactly what work needs to be done and when. Here are some common terms to be familiar with when embarking on your next roofing or gutter project:

Roofing and Gutter Terms

Alligatoring
Alligatoring is a rooftop condition that occurs when the seams open up or the tar and gravel cracks. This commonly happens to most tar and gravel roofs at the end of their lifespan, which is typically 10-12 years. In most cases, the roof should be replaced as soon as possible.

Aluminum Gutters
Aluminum is a moderately priced and rust-resistant material popular with newer installations. It comes unfinished or factory-painted. The downside is that aluminum tends to leak at joints because the metal expands and contracts too much for sealant to hold permanently. It also dents easily.

Copper Gutters
Copper is an expensive material that is strong, durable, rust-resistant and nearly maintenance-free. It will weather green unless you coat it with a clear sealant. It also needs to be installed by a professional.

Deck
A roof’s deck consists of sheathing and underlayment called roofing felt. The material used to finish the roof determines deck types. Most roofs require solid plywood or oriented strand board sheathing, while wood shingle and tile roofs need spaced board sheathing.

Dormers
Dormers create additional openings in your roof, which will affect your roof installation. One notable area is at the joints, which will need to be sealed with metal flashing. The style or dormer can also affect your roofing material. A shed dormer will decrease the slope of your roof over the opening. A gabled dormer often has higher pitches which will shed water more easily.

Fascia Board
Fascia board is the exposed end of your roof. The gutter is normally attached to this.

Read the full article at homeadvisor.com

 

Common Roofing System Areas that Might be Causing Problems

Roofs are susceptible to tons of issues. From surviving harsh weather conditions to needing regular maintenance, they can sometimes require a bit of work to keep them in perfect condition. A roofing system is often complicated with many different parts to consider, so when in doubt, trust your Shelby roofing company to get the repairs done efficiently and effectively. Here are the most common areas of a roofing system that might be causing some problems for your home:

 

The Five Most Common Problem Areas of a Roofing System

Although a roof system can suffer a multitude of issues, below are the five most common roof component problems a roof is susceptible to. These common roof issues are also reasonably easy to identify and repair on your own. Please remember however that if you are uncomfortable accessing your roof safely or feel that this type of work is beyond your skill set contact a professional roofing contractor.

Fascia

Fascia is an architectural term for a band running horizontally and situated vertically under a roof edge. In simpler terms, it’s a roof trim – or the front board along your roof line. It typically consists of wooden boards or sheet metal. So, picture the vertical finishing edge that connects to the ends of rafters, trusses and the area where the gutter attaches to the roof.

The primary function of fascia is to protect by acting as a layer between the edge of the roof and the elements of the outdoors – especially water. It also protects the interior of your building from weather damage by blocking its entrance into the structure. Fascia also plays an aesthetic role, creating a smooth, even appearance for the edge of a roof. Moisture is the number one cause of problems with your fascia so be sure to look for signs of rot or damage and contact a roofing contractor immediately if you notice an issue.

Soffit

Soffit comes from the French word for “formed as a ceiling” and the Latin term for “to fix underneath”. Can you guess where your soffit is? The exposed surface beneath the overhanging section of a roof eave or the finished surface below the fascia and rafters is called the soffit.

Vented soffit has small holes that provide air circulation so it can cycle to the vents and draw heat and moisture away from the house.

It plays an important role in helping to ventilate the attic and prevent rot in the sheathing and rafters. Most soffits are made from vinyl because it is a water-resistant and cost-effective material. It helps regulate the temperature in your attic and through the rest of your home making it a comfortable place to live. Look for cracks, holes and rotting to avoid an easy entrance for water or insects and small animals.

Flashings

Flashings are components used to seal roof system edges, perimeters, penetrations, walls, valleys, drains and any other area where the actual roof covering is interrupted or terminated. The primary function of flashing is to help seal any voids in the roof system where water may enter making these prime areas for leak causes if not checked regularly.

The material is usually aluminum or galvanized steel and, depending on the type of roof you have, is most likely in the valleys, around the chimney and even around dormer windows or skylights. Weather and oxidization are the most common culprits for flashing deterioration but it is possible that flashing can just simply come loose. Most professional roofing contractors cut and shape their own flashing from sheet metal but many flashing pieces today come pre-formed and can be applied without much difficulty using caulking or roof cement.

Read the full article at thespruce.com

Common Roofing System Areas that Might be Causing Problems

Roofs are susceptible to tons of issues. From surviving harsh weather conditions to needing regular maintenance, they can sometimes require a bit of work to keep them in perfect condition. A roofing system is often complicated with many different parts to consider, so when in doubt, trust your Shelby roofing company to get the repairs done efficiently and effectively. Here are the most common areas of a roofing system that might be causing some problems for your home:

 

The Five Most Common Problem Areas of a Roofing System

Although a roof system can suffer a multitude of issues, below are the five most common roof component problems a roof is susceptible to. These common roof issues are also reasonably easy to identify and repair on your own. Please remember however that if you are uncomfortable accessing your roof safely or feel that this type of work is beyond your skill set contact a professional roofing contractor.

Fascia

Fascia is an architectural term for a band running horizontally and situated vertically under a roof edge. In simpler terms, it’s a roof trim – or the front board along your roof line. It typically consists of wooden boards or sheet metal. So, picture the vertical finishing edge that connects to the ends of rafters, trusses and the area where the gutter attaches to the roof.

The primary function of fascia is to protect by acting as a layer between the edge of the roof and the elements of the outdoors – especially water. It also protects the interior of your building from weather damage by blocking its entrance into the structure. Fascia also plays an aesthetic role, creating a smooth, even appearance for the edge of a roof. Moisture is the number one cause of problems with your fascia so be sure to look for signs of rot or damage and contact a roofing contractor immediately if you notice an issue.

Soffit

Soffit comes from the French word for “formed as a ceiling” and the Latin term for “to fix underneath”. Can you guess where your soffit is? The exposed surface beneath the overhanging section of a roof eave or the finished surface below the fascia and rafters is called the soffit.

Vented soffit has small holes that provide air circulation so it can cycle to the vents and draw heat and moisture away from the house.

It plays an important role in helping to ventilate the attic and prevent rot in the sheathing and rafters. Most soffits are made from vinyl because it is a water-resistant and cost-effective material. It helps regulate the temperature in your attic and through the rest of your home making it a comfortable place to live. Look for cracks, holes and rotting to avoid an easy entrance for water or insects and small animals.

Flashings

Flashings are components used to seal roof system edges, perimeters, penetrations, walls, valleys, drains and any other area where the actual roof covering is interrupted or terminated. The primary function of flashing is to help seal any voids in the roof system where water may enter making these prime areas for leak causes if not checked regularly.

The material is usually aluminum or galvanized steel and, depending on the type of roof you have, is most likely in the valleys, around the chimney and even around dormer windows or skylights. Weather and oxidization are the most common culprits for flashing deterioration but it is possible that flashing can just simply come loose. Most professional roofing contractors cut and shape their own flashing from sheet metal but many flashing pieces today come pre-formed and can be applied without much difficulty using caulking or roof cement.

Read the full article at thespruce.com

Tips for Choosing the Perfect Roofing Material

There are so many decisions to make when choosing to repair or replace the roof for your home. From colors to pitch to materials, every choice counts. For expert help in making these important decisions, trust contractors who specialize in East Lansing roofing. Here are some considerations to keep in mind when choosing the perfect material for your roof:

 

Choosing Roofing Materials

From asphalt shingles to wood shakes to clay tiles, here are the many options available for the topside of your home.

 

For most of us the roof is an afterthought—at least until it starts to leak. Then we realize how critical that surface of our house’s exterior really is. Yet, as well as keeping the house dry, the roof contributes greatly to the look of the house, so when building a new house, adding on, or re-roofing, it may pay to consider the options. Right now there are more options in the marketplace than ever, so choosing one is tough. I know because I am in the midst of selecting a roof for my cabin in Maine, and every time I know what I want I look at one of the other options and begin to change my mind! The choices range from asphalt shingles to wood shakes and clay tiles, from steel panels to rubber lookalike slate. The most important trend to note, however, is that as with home-construction materials in general, there is an increasing move towards engineered roofing materials. This change is being driven by a few different factors. One is simply the high cost of wood. The second is that in many cases, codes now mandate the use of fireproof construction materials. And third, people understandably want to build with materials that not only look good but also are very long-lived.

Asphalt Shingles
The roofing material we all see the most of these days—the one that covers the roofs of a great majority of houses across America—is the standard three-tab asphalt shingle. One of the least-expensive roofing options, asphalt shingles are available in a dozen or so different colors both solid and blended. The shingle products being made today are usually guaranteed for 20, or in some cases 30 years, making them an excellent value. Value is the principal advantage of this roofing material, which explains it’s commonality. The disadvantage, however, if there could be said to be one, is the fact that it is so common. The next upgrade from a standard three-tab is a thicker variation called an architectural shingle. These shingles are built up to be about twice as thick as a normal shingle with the layers staggered to give them a heavier, more substantial or “architectural” look. In some colors they resemble slate, and in other colors wood shakes. We used architectural shingles on the Lexington ranch house. With only a modest upgrade in cost and up to a 30-year guarantee, architectural shingles also represent an excellent value with an added touch of style.

Shingles, Shakes…
For looks, it is hard to beat a wood shingle roof. Over time it weathers out to a gray or soft silver that seems to root the house to the landscape. Several species are used: Western Red Cedar, Alaskan Yellow Cedar and Eastern White Cedar. Shingles are relatively smooth and cut to a uniform thickness, although they vary in width. Wood shakes are thicker and rougher, being split rather than sawn from the logs. Wood roofs are meant to breathe and should be laid over a substrate that allows air to circulate behind them: skip sheathing—wood strips or battens nailed directly to the roof rafters—is the traditional method of installing a wood shingle roof. About 10 years ago we began using a plastic matrix product that is something like a scrubby pad, which allows air to circulate behind the shingles. This product can be laid on top of a building-paper-coated plywood roof deck, making it ideal for a retrofit. Another method of getting air circulation behind the shingles is to lay them on pressure-treated lattice. For all their great looks, shingles and shakes are expensive to install and do require some periodic maintenance, typically in the form of washing to remove any mildew or moss, and then re-oiling with a clear wood finishing product. On our current Shingle-style project here in Manchester, Massachusetts, we’re using a wood shingle that is new to us: pressure-treated Southern Yellow Pine, which grays out in a few years to resemble cedar and is said to require no maintenance at all. A properly installed and maintained wood roof should last at least 30 to 50 years. In fact, we have seen roofs on which the shingles were still good after 25 years or so, but the galvanized nails were finally rusting, so be sure to use a high-quality stainless-steel nail!

Read the full article at thisoldhouse.com

 

     

10 Fun Things You Probably Didn’t Know About Roofing

Here at Roof One Michigan, we love sharing all of our practical knowledge about shingles, gutters and siding, just to name a few. If you ever need questions answered, give us a call. After all, we have years of experience in roofing Canton, MI. In the meantime, here’s some fun roofing facts to brighten up your day:



 

 

10 Fun and Interesting Roofing Facts

Since the dawn of civilization, there have been many, many discoveries and advances in roofing materials and techniques. Here are a few of our favorite “did you know”s for you to enjoy!

  1. 1 . Some of the oldest roofing materials in the world are thatch, clay, and stone. Thatch was likely used between 5000 and 1800 B.C.. Clay tiles can be traced all the way back to around 10,000 B.C.!
  2. Thatched roofs are effective because the reed used is naturally waterproof, and is bundled so tightly that it simply sheds water. A thatched roof can shed water, sleet, and snow.
  3. Red and white cedar shingles are listed as one of the most “classic” roofing types for homes in the Pacific Northwest.
  4. While the idea of natural building materials still holds strong sentimental appeal, some insurance companies charge more to cover a home with a wood-shake roof because of the potential for fire, and others won’t insure it at all.
  5. Metal roofing materials are often lighter in weight than wood shingles.
  6. Even though asphalt shingles are a newer product (invented circa 1900), they are by far the most popular roofing product in America.
  7. Green roofing materials are longer lasting than asphalt roofing tiles.
  8. Traditional green roofs (the type with plants going on them) don’t leak if they are installed properly. This is because the plants and soil protect your roof from sun damage and extreme temperature changes. So, as long as the water barrier is intact, a green roof can keep your home dry for years to come.
  9. Water tends to travels before it drips down visibly. Interestingly, a leak can come out twenty feet away from the original leak in a roof.
  10. The most common weak spots on your roof are areas that need protection from flashing. However, damaged shingles or damage in the waterproofing material which lays underneath the shingles are also common causes of roof leaks. A leak may not mean you need to replace your entire roof. However, if the leak has persisted lasted long enough without management, there is likely dry rot involved – or the roof is very old – it may be time to get it replaced.

Read the full story at jewellroofing.com

 

3 Things You Never Knew About Shingles

There’s much more to roofing than meets the eye. For roofing in Livonia, MI, we’re your experts who worry about the small details so you don’t have to. One of those details is shingles. Although shingles can seem simple on the surface, they are often a little more complex than many realize. Here’s some things you might not have known about shingles:

3 Things You Didn’t Know About Roofing Shingles

Since roofing shingles are the most popular type of material for the roof, most people assume they know what shingles are all about. That may have been true 50 years ago, but shingles have come a long way since then. Take a closer look at your options when it’s time for a new roof.

They’re Not Just Rectangular

When you think about shingles, you have a pretty good idea of what the finished product is going to look like. Sure, there might be variations in color or thickness, but you imagine neat rows of rectangular shingles. This doesn’t have to be the case. If you’re looking for a unique look for your home, you’ll be happy to learn that shingles come in a variety of shapes, including diamond and curved shapes.

There’s More Than Asphalt

Asphalt shingles are what you think about when someone says “shingles,” but there are more choices these days. For instance, metal shingles will give your home a more traditional look, but they’ll last twice as long as traditional shingles. Shingles can also be made from wood — often called “shakes” — stone, or clay.

They Can Prevent Moss and Algae Growth

If you’ve ever had black streaks on your roof, you may be surprised to learn that this comes from algae growth, not dirt. Algae and moss grow on roofs that remain damp, usually when there are trees blocking the path of the sun. If you don’t want to think about cutting down the trees, you could get shingles that have small copper granules embedded in the asphalt. These prevent moss and algae growth.

Read the full story at roofity.com

The Differences Between Black and White Roofing Options

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Choosing the right roof type and color to fit your house or business can be a daunting task. If you need help navigating roofing in Dexter, MI, we can help discuss what roofing options would be best for your property. The following article discusses the pros and cons of choosing between black and white roofs:


Black vs. White Roofing

There’s much more to selecting a roof membrane than color – but it’s not a black-and-white decision. The environmental benefits of exposed-membrane, low-slope roofing systems with high solar reflectance and thermal emittance have been established by the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and others. Generally white in color or with white surfacing, these membra nes reduce the solar radiation collected by roofing surfaces, which lowers the roof-surface contribution to the energy used to condition air and to the local environment. (All cool roofs are included as white roofs in this article because tan and other membranes meet high reflectance/emittance requirements.) But white isn’t always best.

Why Not a Black-and-White Decision?
If high solar reflectance and emittance are better, and generally found in white membranes, why isn’t the decision black and white? There are three reasons.


Reason No. 1: Surface Temperature vs. Durability .
Some manufacturers propose that a white membrane equals greater durability, which is a misleading claim. Any membrane will be more durable if its surface temperature is lower on any roof; however, a cooler membrane in a particular location on a particular building isn’t necessarily more durable than a different membrane on the same building that’s not as “cool.” Although it may be necessary (by law) or desirable to use a white membrane, that membrane isn’t necessarily more durable than a black membrane. Carl G. Cash, in The Relative Durability of Low-Slope Roofing, described the mean local temperature (thermal load) and its effect on membrane durability. All membranes show lower durability in southern U.S. climates compared to more temperate climates. Many white membranes are less durable in all climates, and less durable than black membranes in any climate. 

Reason No. 2: Heating Benefits in Cold Climates .
Some manufacturers propose that a black membrane lowers heating costs by more than any penalty for added cooling costs, which is also a potentially misleading claim. There are scientific and common-sense arguments about the comparison of black and white membranes in temperate climates. For many buildings in temperate climates, there is no air conditioning and no reduced air-conditioning energy benefit for the use of a white roofing system, and there is some heating benefit to black roofing in the winter (the benefit varies with the amount of sunshine); however, even if you don’t air condition your building, you may want it cooler in the summer.

Reason No. 3: Environmental Benefits of Durability. The benefits of the CRRC Rating Program, the U.S. DOE’s ENERGY STAR program, and other government regulations requiring high-reflectance (and high-emittance) membranes don’t address the environmental benefit/penalty of durable/less durable roofing membranes. While there are acknowledged limitations on the evaluations of reflectance and emittance values, they’re still useful tools.

The environmental benefits of any roofing decision can be thought of as part of the quality and value understanding of the cost (initial and/or life-cycle) and durability. If you’re limited to solar reflectance standards (e.g. ENERGY STAR), you’re led to white roofing. If you’re limited to proven service life, you’re more likely to determine that a black membrane is appropriate.

Presently, we have useful and on-going science related to solar reflectance/emittance. We have the 10-year-old work by Cash related to durability and life-cycle costs. But we don’t yet have a thorough understanding of the environmental cradle-to-grave costs of any black roofing membrane compared to a white membrane, such as environmental risks of manufacturing, installation, and disposal. For now, we base our evaluation on the best data we have from the CRRC, the DOE, and Cash.

Beyond Black vs. White
Black membranes need not create black roofs. Vegetated green roofs can use black membranes because performance isn’t affected by the membrane solar reflectance. Ballasted black membranes can have similar performance to white membranes. Built-up membranes can be surfaced with ENERGY STAR cap sheets, creating a white membrane. Coatings can be applied to low-performing membranes, based on solar reflectance and emittance, to meet the California Energy Code. (Long-term durability in terms of coatings is a concern, and is the subject of testing; some coatings, such as methyl methacrylate, are likely to be durable.)

Read the full story at buildings.com

     

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